Wake Forest University Affiliation

Reynolda House and Wake Forest University were formally affiliated in 2002. The affiliation has created a multitude of academic, campus life, and administrative collaborations.

Students on Front Lawn at Class of 2014 Orientation in August 2010

Wake Forest University Affiliation

In one of the first programs of its kind, in 2010 all incoming Wake Forest students studied Frederic Church's masterpiece, The Andes of Ecuador, as their summer academic experience, and discussed the painting over dinner on the Reynolda lawn.

Wake Forest University Affiliation

The Museum welcomes Wake Forest students, families, and alumni during Family Weekends, Homecoming, and other campus-wide events. 

Wake Forest University Affiliation

School spirit is experienced all across the Reynolda Campus and Reynolda Estate. All University employees and a guest can visit the Museum for free. Several events each year are also offered to the University community at no cost.

Students walk the trail from Wake Forest to Reynolda

Wake Forest University Affiliation

A beautifully wooded walking trail connects the University to Reynolda. Students, faculty, and staff enjoy walking, jogging, and relaxing throughout the landscape. 

Allison Perkins talks with Wake Forest students

Wake Forest University Affiliation

Students visit Reynolda House during their classes, for research, and for programs throughout the year. Several Wake Forest students are selected for internships at the Museum each semester.

Reynolda House Curator Allison Slaby with Wake Forest Professor Jay Curley

Wake Forest University Affiliation

Reynolda House and Wake Forest University were formally affiliated in 2002. The affiliation has created a multitude of academic, campus life, and administrative collaborations.
 

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Wake Forest University Affiliation

In an agreement described as historic and visionary, Reynolda House Museum of American Art became an affiliate of its longtime neighbor Wake Forest University in 2002. Reynolda House President Barbara B. Millhouse and Wake Forest President Thomas K. Hearn Jr. announced the new relationship in an afternoon press conference on January 15, 2002.

Millhouse declared that the affiliation would enhance both institutions, and give Reynolda House long-term stability, further national visibility, and access to additional resources. Hearn affirmed that the affiliation is part of a common destiny, and the agreement ensured the further success of Reynolda’s legacy. Both leaders emphasized that the Museum's mission would remain unchanged.

In the late 1940s, Mary Reynolds and Charles Babcock contributed a large portion of the family estate for the construction of Wake Forest's Reynolda Campus, which opened in 1956. Read more about Wake Forest's move to Winston-Salem, and watch a 1951 NBC News story on the groundbreaking.

Today, the mission and work of the University and Museum are overlapping with greater intention than ever. Reynolda House is an instrumental partner in the University’s mission of educating the whole student. Faculty of Wake Forest are regular participants in  Reynolda House programming, providing lectures, concerts, interdisciplinary courses, book discussions, readings and seminars. A Student Advocacy Council creates opportunities for Wake Forest students to engage with the Museum and offers guidance on ways to better involve college students. Art lectures given at Reynolda House by artists and art historians of national prominence enrich the course offerings of Wake Forest, as well.

Employees of Wake Forest University and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receive free admission for themselves and one guest for general touring of the Museum.